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Networking 101: Part II - Understanding IP Network Cabling - securitycamera2000 help
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Networking 101: Part II - Understanding IP Network Cabling

Post on 2nd of June, 2014
Understanding IP Network Cabling
Your choice of cabling is one of the most important decisions you’ll make when installing the right type of cable for your IP network. Network cabling is the backbone of your network, and your cabling is extremely important for your application; IP security applications require a robust backbone.
What is Network Cabling?
Network cabling is the connecting cabling between the floors or areas of a building. If you have a 3-story building, between each floor is the cabling that connects to your routers.
Twisted Pair Cables
Twisted pair cables consist of two insulated copper wires and is a form of wiring in which two conductors are twisted together. Twisted pair cables can be shielded, unshielded or foiled, and the twisting of the cabling is designed to cancel out electromagnetic interference from external sources and other devices.
Fiber Optic Cables
Fiber optic cables have a glass core center, consisting of several threads of glass surrounded by layers of protective material with an outer insulated jacket. Fiber optic cables do not transmit electronic signals; they transfer light which eliminates the problem of electrical interference. Fiber optic cables can transmit data over longer distances, but can be difficult to install. Fiber optic cables have greater bandwidth than metal cables and can carry more data.
Coaxial Cables
Coaxial cables (Coax) transmit an electrical impulse signal along the length of the cable, between the center and outer conductor which share the same center line (axis). The outer conductor acts as a shield, defending against interfering signals. Coax cabling also keep the signals from escaping and interfering with nearby devices. In order for a megapixel IP camera to work over existing coax cabling, you need to use an adapter.
Network Cable Categories
There are a few main types of cable categories: category 3, category 5, category 5e, and category 6 cable. They’re all very similar and represent data transmission, but the speeds, length and cable type vary between them. For example, in a twisted pair cable, the tighter the twist, the faster the cables can talk to each other.
CAT-3 Cables
Category 3 (CAT-3) cabling is an unshielded twisted pair of UTP cables. CAT-3 cables are not twisted together very tightly (compared to a CAT-5 cable). A 10 megabit or a 10 T cable, which is CAT-3, has bandwidth to handle 10 megabits of data per second and can run for 100 meters.
CAT-5 Cables
 100 ft CAT5 Patch Cable
100 ft CAT5 Patch Cable
Category 5 (CAT-5) cabling is an unshielded twisted pair of cables that contain 4 pairs of copper wires. CAT-5 cables are twisted together more tightly than CAT-3 cables and can move data at faster speeds. CAT-5 cables rely on the tightly twisted design and differential signaling to cancel out noise. 100 T cable, which is CAT-5, has bandwidth to handle 100 megabits of data per second and is still limited to 100 meters of distance it can run.
CAT-5e Cables
Category-5e (CAT-5e) cabling stands for Category-5, enhanced). CAT-5e cables are unshielded, twisted pair, copper gigabit cables which can support networking at Gigabit Ethernet speeds. Gigabit cables have the bandwidth to handle 1,000 megabits (1 gigabit) of data per second and can run up to 100 meters in distance. CAT-5e cables can run 1,000 megabits (1 gigabit) of data up to 100 meters at a cable frequency rate of 100 MHz.
CAT-6 Cables
Category-6 (CAT-6) cables are also unshielded, twisted pair, copper gigabit cables which can support networking at Gigabit Ethernet speeds, but CAT-6 cables have thicker copper wiring and can transfer data and more reliably than CAT-5e. CAT-6 cables can transfer 1,000 megabits (1 gigabit) of data up to 100 meters at a cable frequency rate of 250 MHz.
Cable Standards for IP Cameras
Regardless of the difference of each type of cable, you should note that each type of network cable runs up to 100 meters. Cable standards for IP cameras are 100 meters. This is important because when you are running IP cameras, the maximum distance you can run it before you have to use an extender or power injector is 328 feet, or 100 meters. This is different from running analog cameras, which allow you to run from 100 feet, and if you add an injector, you can run 1,000 feet.
Understanding IP Network Cabling
Your choice of cabling is one of the most important decisions you’ll make when installing the right type of cable for your IP network. Network cabling is the backbone of your network, and your cabling is extremely important for your application; IP security applications require a robust backbone.


What is Network Cabling?
Network cabling is the connecting cabling between the floors or areas of a building. If you have a 3-story building, between each floor is the cabling that connects to your routers.


Twisted Pair Cables
Twisted pair cables consist of two insulated copper wires and is a form of wiring in which two conductors are twisted together. Twisted pair cables can be shielded, unshielded or foiled, and the twisting of the cabling is designed to cancel out electromagnetic interference from external sources and other devices.


Fiber Optic Cables
Fiber optic cables have a glass core center, consisting of several threads of glass surrounded by layers of protective material with an outer insulated jacket. Fiber optic cables do not transmit electronic signals; they transfer light which eliminates the problem of electrical interference. Fiber optic cables can transmit data over longer distances, but can be difficult to install. Fiber optic cables have greater bandwidth than metal cables and can carry more data.


Coaxial Cables
Coaxial cables (Coax) transmit an electrical impulse signal along the length of the cable, between the center and outer conductor which share the same center line (axis). The outer conductor acts as a shield, defending against interfering signals. Coax cabling also keep the signals from escaping and interfering with nearby devices. In order for a megapixel IP camera to work over existing coax cabling, you need to use an adapter.
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